Meeting with clients

Meeting with clients

Every web designer has his or her own way of holding a meeting with clients. There are several ways to do that, but a few tips might help make such contact more productive. The first meeting with a client may be considered one of the most important steps of a project, and the project’s level of success may very well be established right there and then. What NOT to do: Do not attempt to talk about or explain “design” to the client. The first wall run into over a meeting between client and designer is the fact that those two usually speak a different language and live in worlds apart. This person across from you is the only one who really matters in the meeting. The language and universe of design are of no consequence to them, therefore do not waste time trying to transport them into your world. You are there to learn about the client’s universe, and not the other way around. That is not to say that you should conceal your competence, but there are better ways to do that than talking “difficult” to make an impression. Do not ask the client design-related questions. Designing is your job, not the client’s. Designers usually think in terms of layout, colors, shape, navigation, functionality, usability, and so on… but these issues normally do not mean much to the client. Although it may seem logical, asking the client design-related questions is quite often a mistake. It is the same as asking a site’s user about HTML, XML, PHP… Most times, such questions are not actually relevant. What is relevant,...
Design: too much information

Design: too much information

Most sites oppress and confound, fragmenting and breaking off information. “I suspect, however, that (Funes) was not exactly versed in thinking. Thinking means forgetting differences, generalizing, abstracting.” (Funes, o Memorioso, Ficções, Jorge Luis Borges). “In order to think, we inevitably need to generalize, and in doing so, we must forget” A short while ago, I was reading a book about memory when I came across a note on the short story Funes, O Memorioso, by Jorge Luis Borges. In the short story above, Borges describes a character, Irineu Funes who, from a certain point in his life on, develops perfect memory, that is, he is able to recall absolutely everything. He manages to grasp the particulars of everything he lives, capable to remember a whole day of his life in minute detail, to the last second, even if it took him another whole day to do so. However, what most impressed me about Funes was not his astonishing memory skills, but his “inability to forget”. “In order to think, we inevitably need to generalize, and in doing so, we must forget”. (A Memória de Borges, Virgílio Fernandes Almeida). Transporting this account into the universe of design, we realize that the Internet is becoming increasingly similar to Funes. The number of details and the overabundance of information in today’s sites smother users. Most current sites oppress and confound, fragmenting and breaking off information. “Nevertheless, I suspect that (Funes) was not capable of thinking… In Funes’ overloaded world there was nothing but details…” (Funes, o Memorioso, Ficções, Jorge Luis Borges). Web designers must realize they do not have to “show users...