UX thesis digital curation

UX thesis digital curation

Curation has a distinguished history in cultural institutions. In galleries and museums, curators use judgment and a refined sense of style to select and arrange art to create a narrative, evoke a response, and communicate a message. As the digital landscape becomes increasingly complex, and as businesses become ever more comfortable using the web to bring their product and audience closer, the techniques and principles of museum curatorship can inform how we create online experiences—particularly when we approach content. Bloggers can also be considered as curators and experts of a particular subject, hand-picking others’ assets around a particular theme or topic and then layering in their own distinct voice. When a site launches, your audience arrives to learn more about what you know most about. It’s critical to create a content experience with purpose, that is consistent and contextual. This helps to assert your brand’s authority, establishes relationships with your audience, and secures a return visit based on your content’s value. The content strategist-as-curator is the one who makes this happen. UX thesis is a digital curation website. The aim of this project is to establish and develop long term repositories of User Experience digital assets (thesis, papers, workshop papers, book chapters, reports) for current and future reference by researchers, scientists, historians, and...
UX Framework

UX Framework

[wide][/wide] Much of Human-Computer Interaction work has tended to derive from a Cognitive Psychology approach, viewing the human brain much like a computer processor, primarily as a respondent to different kinds of stimulus. But that model doesn’t touch dimensions of human experience such as emotion, social interaction and inter-subjectivity. The Human-Computer Interaction model doesn’t touch dimensions of human experience such as emotion, social interaction and inter-subjectivity More recent work is beginning to tackle this imbalance towards cognitive approaches, looking to aesthetic and cultural disciplines for inspiration, ideation and transferable knowledge. The current research adopts such an approach, drawing on theories of literary studies, philosophy and psychology in devising an interpretive framework for understanding and analyzing user experience with computer artifacts and, in particular, web interfaces. The experience framework draws on the multidisciplinary works of John Dewey (philosophy), Mikhail Bakhtin (literary theory/philosophy) and Csikszentmihalyi (psychology) to provide a conceptualisation of experience with specific relevance to computer-mediated activities, aimed at assisting understanding of and designing for user aesthetic experiences with emerging technologies. It suggests nine foundational and universal dimensions of an aesthetic experience (that which is appreciative, perceiving and involves undergoing, where the emotional, practical and intellectual phases move toward a consummation together), namely that it is: Educative and memorable: affecting and affected by previous experiences and the objective possibilities open to the experiencing subject. Whole and unique: an experience cannot be repeated due to the coming together of various conditions, persons, objects, all in a given context and at a certain time. Historical: activities exist in a cultural-historical setting, influenced by past happenings. Also, experiences are linked through their meaning...