Beauty as a source of value

Beauty as a source of value

Beauty is an important ingredient of our daily lives. We admire and praise the beauty of nature, architecture, music, other people… Given its pervasiveness, the lack of research addressing aesthetics in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is striking. ~Marc Hassenzahl Text extracted from “Aesthetics in interactive products: Correlates and consequences of beauty” by Marc Hassenzahl Obviously, beauty is a source of value. In one study, participants saw and rated pictures of two different toasters. While being equal in function, the toasters differed in beauty. Among other things, participants were asked to state their willingness to pay for both toasters. On average, participants were willing to spend $37.20 on the beautiful toaster, but only $24.05 on the not so beautiful toaster. In other words, beauty was worth $13.16, i.e. an increase of about 55%. Although the notion that beauty adds value seems intuitive, studies reveal a more complex picture. Whether beauty adds value can depend on individual or situational aspects. In the toaster study already mentioned above, it was identified an individual difference, the so-called centrality of visual product aesthetics (CVPA), as an important moderator of beauty’s value. CVPA subsumes three aspects: Value, acumen and response. Individuals with a high CVPA attach personal value to beauty (e.g., “Beautiful product designs make our world a better place to live”); they think of themselves as connoisseurs, able to perceive the subtlest differences in beauty (e.g., “I see things in a product’s design that other people tend to pass over”) and they strongly respond to beautiful things (e.g., “If a product’s design really ‘speaks’ to me, I feel that I must buy it”). High CVPA individuals are more prone to use a visual style of processing, they more strongly desire...
UX thesis digital curation

UX thesis digital curation

Curation has a distinguished history in cultural institutions. In galleries and museums, curators use judgment and a refined sense of style to select and arrange art to create a narrative, evoke a response, and communicate a message. As the digital landscape becomes increasingly complex, and as businesses become ever more comfortable using the web to bring their product and audience closer, the techniques and principles of museum curatorship can inform how we create online experiences—particularly when we approach content. Bloggers can also be considered as curators and experts of a particular subject, hand-picking others’ assets around a particular theme or topic and then layering in their own distinct voice. When a site launches, your audience arrives to learn more about what you know most about. It’s critical to create a content experience with purpose, that is consistent and contextual. This helps to assert your brand’s authority, establishes relationships with your audience, and secures a return visit based on your content’s value. The content strategist-as-curator is the one who makes this happen. UX thesis is a digital curation website. The aim of this project is to establish and develop long term repositories of User Experience digital assets (thesis, papers, workshop papers, book chapters, reports) for current and future reference by researchers, scientists, historians, and...
Seminar on Design & Emotion – 12/13 Jan 2012

Seminar on Design & Emotion – 12/13 Jan 2012

[wide][wide] The first Brazilian Seminar on Design and Emotion will take place in Porto Alegre, the capital of the southernmost state in the country, on 12-13 January 2012. It will be the first initiative of the Design and Emotion Society in South America, launching the Local Chapter in Brazil. Starting from this Ist Brazilian Seminar, the board of the Local Chapter (Dr. Leandro Tonetto and Marcos Nähr) promises to keep the local scientific and professional communities updated about the emerging issues in the field of Design and Emotion. PROGRAM The two-day Seminar is going to discuss emerging practices and approaches on Design and Emotion, including presentations from Pieter Desmet (TUDelft), keynote speaker, Leandro Tonetto (Zooma and Unisinos), Filipe Campelo da Costa (Unisinos), and Marcos Nahr (Dell). In the first day, apart from individual presentations from the speakers, a workshop will be developed with students, focusing on socially relevant topics. In the second day, the Seminar includes an industry-orientated workshop for professionals. We hope that the Ist Brazilian Seminar on Design and Emotion can help developing research and design practices in the field in South America! Registration info will follow soon! The Design & Emotion Society – Porto Alegre...
About User Experience

About User Experience

[wide][/wide] Three points about User Experience. User experience should not be only about use We seem to undermine what is happening to computing. Interactions with computing systems become subtle, part of natural human activities, such as walking in a city, participating in conversations. Usability and joy derived from interaction will eventually blur out. Instead, we should strive to understand in what ways computing can support human experiences. We should be inquiring into prolonged use HCI and UX consequently has focused on initial use. But there are a number of trends that ask our attention for prolonged use. First, products are increasing becoming service-center, with revenues rooted more in the services than in the actual product. Second, length and coverage of product warranties increase. Soft reliability project: “48% of all returned products, are technically fully functional, i.e. according to specifications” Memories are (sometimes) more relevant than experiences Literature in Psychology suggests that experiences can only be measured at the time of their occurrence. Once they have ended, experiential information does not exist; it can only be reconstructed from recalled contextual cues. But memories are not necessarily a source of bias. They are just a different source of information. Often, memories are more relevant than experiences, for example when evaluating our past or predicting our future. Text by Evangelos Karapanos,...
Design collaboration behind Nokia’s 1st Windows Phone

Design collaboration behind Nokia’s 1st Windows Phone

[wide][/wide] Nokia Lumia 800: an in-depth video documentary about the design collaboration story behind Nokia’s first Windows Phone. The Nokia Lumia 800 builds on Nokia’s “fabula” design language, a visual style that has been created to be used across a range of products, including the Nokia N9. But in creating Nokia’s first Windows Phone there was a whole lot more to the process than simply blending together Nokia hardware and Microsoft software. Great collaboration isn’t a science. It’s about the people ~Kate Freebairn, Creative Director, Lumia UX Design There was an amazing amount of collaboration and a brave new approach to design that was applied to enable this product to come to life. This process was underpinned by a shared vision and determination from both Nokia and Microsoft, passionately articulated by Stefan Pannenbecker, VP of Industrial Design at Nokia: We had one simple goal… to build a better phone. Something that seamlessly fuses the best industrial design with the best software and user experience....