Annoying Web

Annoying Web

The 65 Most Annoying things about the Web Today. by Bradley Hebdon. We’ve come a long way on the web today. Or have we?  While we’ve innovated in many areas, we’ve also continued to disregard pre-existing issues. And in some cases, we have also created new ones. Here is my list of the top 65 most annoying things about the web today. They’re in no particular order, but I have organized them into what I consider core groups. Using the Web can still be a very annoying experience! Poor Design Illegible text. I can’t read that, it’s too small. And what on earth is that font called? Busy backgrounds.  Oh MySpace, why do you allow users to create profiles like that? My eyes hurt. Obscure links. I’m confused, can I click on that or not? Oh I get it, you don’t want me to view other pages. Flyouts that are too large. Holy crap Yahoo!  This is a page within a flyout! Drop-down menu navigation too many levels deep. OK, if I slowly move my mouse this way first… dammit Jim, I’m a doctor not a magician! Complicated navigation. I just want to get to that page, the one over there! Oh I see, you want me to complete the maze first. Abused centerpieces. Aren’t centerpieces supposed to serve as mechanisms for promotion, rather than areas to cram an entire page’s worth of content into itself? Call me an idealist, I guess. Poor navigation labels. Give me a clue and use labels that make sense! Clutter & chaos. With no emphasis or information hierarchy, it’s difficult for me to know what to...
What’s a banner for, anyway?

What’s a banner for, anyway?

A few topics on the creation of an effective banner. The main job of a banner, oddly enough, is to take the users somewhere they probably weren’t planning on going. That is, to steer them from what they are actually looking for in the site. To that end, banners must be compelling. A successful banner explores the fact that people tend to focus on answers without really defining the questions. The main job of a banner is to take the users somewhere they weren’t planning on going That’s why some issues must be considered when creating banners. Three of them are essential. Appeal. First of all, banners must be visible. They have to stand out from their surroundings. Allure. After drawing the users’ attention, you also have to spark their interest. The message must be convincing, and the design must inspire that trust. Recognition. Building an image is vital in distinguishing oneself from the competition and in generating reliability. We must bring the message into the users’ cognitive model, so that they not only see the banner, but also take notice of it. Banners should be approached as a communicative tool, and not mere “little boxes” where we stack all the information we wish to convey to the users. It is of great help to mind a few basic aspects, such as choosing the appropriate site for the placement of the banner, thus enhancing its potential within the desired target audience. Identify beforehand the environment in which the banner will be placed and make sure it will be visible in the site’s general context. The message must be clear,...
Why do we sometimes ignore banners?

Why do we sometimes ignore banners?

Our brain, as a result of previous experiences, works out cognitive models and disregards irrelevant elements when searching for information. More…“Were it a case of agnosia, the patient would see now what he had always seen, that is, he would not have suffered any decrease in his visual acuity; the brain would have simply become unable to recognize a chair where there was one… it would have lost the ability to know it knew…” We tend to believe the visual world is brought to us by the mere information reaching our eyes. In his book “An Essay on Blindness“, José Saramago mentions the existence of that unusual visual condition which, despite being associated to the eyes, is in fact a neurological disorder. We tend to believe the visual world is brought to us by the mere information reaching our eyes. However, any knowledge of the world around us implies assigning meaning, or in other words, everything presented to us must be interpreted. Such assignment of meaning requires converting insignificant elements into objects packed with cultural substance. The fact that most of us, including design-related professionals, are oblivious in that respect is somewhat intriguing, basically because the world we live in is loaded with objects. We go through life identifying, classifying, utilizing and evaluating objects, creating meaning for everything around us. In the universe of electronic graphic interfaces, a variation of visual agnosia has been detected and is currently under study. It is called banner blindness and is described as a tendency the users have to simply ignore some shapes, colors, patterns and everything else in relative proximity. In those...