Network @ work

Network @ work

When we talk about networking, we often focus on connecting with people outside our organizations. But networking with colleagues is just as crucial. In this text, you’ll learn the rules of being an effective organizational networker, a lynchpin of productivity.   Well-networked people bridge the organizational silos that plague all organizations   Following these rules will help you become more collaborative without wasting your time. Teaching them to others will create organization-wide results. Start by mapping the networks in your business, both formal and informal. Look at the structure: who are the hubs and who are the islands? Evaluate for diversity: do networks cross organizational and geographic silos? Do they include senior and junior people, men and women, and people from different backgrounds? Identify the weak spots and tailor your intervention. The result will be an organization that collaborates, yes, but that does so with discipline. Rule 1. Build outward, not inward. The first four rules will help you get better at identifying effective networking opportunities. Start by remembering that the point of collaborative networking is to connect people who wouldn’t ordinarily work together. Don’t waste your time deepening connections with people you already know. Balance these connections by staying in touch with people on other teams or in other business units. Rule 2: Go for diversity, not size. A bloated Rolodex used to signal a skilled networker. Let’s hope that idea soon goes the way of the Rolodex itself. Rather than aiming for a massive network, focus on building an efficient one. This requires knowing people with different skills and viewpoints. They should be different from you, of...
Social Media HQ

Social Media HQ

Dell’s CEO Michael Dell and CMO Karen Quintos will officially launch the company’s Social Media Listening Command Center today [12/10/2010]. by Erica Swallow [Erica Swallow | Mashable] We first heard wind of this development in October when Dell’s Vice President of Social Media() and Community Manish Mehta announced that Dell had plans to launch the program at Altimeter’s Rise of Social Commerce Conference. Just more than two months later, that announcement is coming to fruition with the opening of the center. Shortly after the October announcement, Mehta commented on a blog post by Altimeter’s Industry Analyst Jeremiah Owyang about the project’s purpose: “Our new ‘Ground Control’ is about tracking the largest number [of] possible conversations across the web and making sure we ‘internalize’ that feedback — good and bad… “Dell’s Ground Control is also about getting that information to the right people wherever they are in the Dell organization, globally and functionally. It’s also about tracking what you might call the ‘long tail’… those smaller matters that might not bubble to the surface today, but are out there… and deserve to be heard. We want to ‘hear’ them too — contrary to the scenarios about ’squeaky wheels getting grease.’” Based in its Austin headquarters, Dell’s new social monitor center will be an integral part of its @Dellcares customer care and tech support. The company already does a commendable job at reaching its global audience via social media, but it plans to up the ante by offering support in 11 languages by the end of the year. Dell is using social media monitoring tool Radian6() to power its data collection....
Virtual Age

Virtual Age

You, Yourselves, and Facebook. One of my students at ComDig is writing a paper about the multiple personalities we have and how we are using those personalities in the digital world. Researching on the subject I found this interesting blog post by Marc Fenigstein where he talks about the importance of this movement, from a digital age to a virtual age. “From a Digital Age to a Virtual Age” It’s not a new concept that just as we moved from an analog age to a digital age, we are now moving from a digital age to a virtual age. Cloud services, social networks, and VOIP are all facilitating the virtualization of our world and our selves. Interestingly, we are not virtualizing ourselves as a single entity. We are creating multiple personae for individual contexts. These are not characters we play, like Second Life; these are each intended as accurate but distinct representations of our true selves. We may, for example, maintain very different personae for Linked-In, Facebook, and our personal blog (sometimes several personal blogs). I call this phenomenon “segmented virtualization.” Internet age has made our lives more and more public: the information is out there and we have limited control over its proliferation. We hear very much about identity theft, but there is little formal commentary on the social implications. We create multiple personae as a reaction against this loss of control – much like a media blitz or propaganda, this is a proactive effort to shape our public image before the internet does it for us. Again, unlike Second Life, the goal isn’t anonymity; it is public...